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, new york. >> can we pull off and take a snap? >> pull off tomorrow and take a snap. good advice. >> see you, everybody. we will be right back if we are awake. that really meets your needs a plan and your budget? as you probably know, medicare only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they cover some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you in out-of-pocket medical costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand medicare and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you. with this type of plan, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients... plus, there are no networks, and you'll never need a referral to see a specialist. there's a range of plans to choose from, too. and they all travel with you. anywhere in the country. join the millions who have already enrolled in the only medicare supplement plans endorsed by
need help. we desperately need help in the new york, new jersey area. last night two billion people around the world tuned into a benefit concert to help raise money for sand's reliefestings and now it is time for the government to step up to the place. congress has stepped up 39 times to help state and local governments to respond to disasters. there is a wisdom here that has been in the federal government for decades. that is, when god's hand strikes no localities can handle it on their own. we unite as a nation to help one another. following katrina the government passed aid following 10 days of after the storm. we passed nine fundamentals a total of $108 billion and frankly, the damage from sandy, the economic damage is worse. they lost about 270,000 homes and in new york we lost 305,000 homes. that is new york alone. they had about 20,000 small businesses, put out of business, gone. we have over 270,000. so the damage is enormous. and you know, we members of new york delegation have always been there when other parts of the nation were struck by distafters. new york tax dollars
that? "the new york times" recently wrote that in florida, quote, as he ballot scandal seemed to arrive like clockwork. end of quote. i am pleased that two secretaries of state are with us today. i welcome i was secretary of state, matt schulz, state election officials are well-versed on the procedures that are needed to run their elections. conscientious state officials such as my secretary of state have sought to remove noncitizens from the voter rolls. federal officials did not assist them in ensuring that legal holes are not honored by the counting of votes from ineligible voters. in fact, the department fact the department of homeland security did all he could to prevent maintaining integrity of voting roll. we will hear that turnout rises when ballot integrity is fostered. states have a fair amount of discretion in how they choose to run elections. early voting has grown in popularity. but there's a cost even beyond the lack of a common civic engagement on election day. and i look forward to this hearing, and hope that we get an answer to these questions. but circumstances could c
and that is the newspaper and the lower hudson valley of upstate new york published the addresses of gun owners and now as you were talking eric, one lawmaker want to make that illegal. >> lawmaker state senator greg ball had this to say on cavuto. >> it is not upon illegal. this is not the first time the editorial board has done it. we have a bipartisan bill in the assembly and it is it a liberal new york state . this bill can get done. it is not about the second amendment only. it is a privacy. they should not done it victims of domestic violence and retired police. no way that the paper should have made it accessible for crim nams and we have seen what nut jobs can be capable of. >> they have done it for the handgun owners, publishing names and address said and never did it for domestic violence or sex offenders or sexual predators or any other cause than gun owners, legally and honest and law abiding citizens. >> kelly: that is an issue and perhaps there could be retaliation against the paper. >> julia: and the other said who said foil a freedom of information request and get that information there
from new york. mr. schumer: i ask unanimous consent the quorum call be repealed. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. schumer: thank you, mr. president. first i want to thank my great colleague from pennsylvania, i enjoyed sharing a table last night with him and his beautiful, charming, intelligent wife, who he's lucky he would be the first to admit he's lucky to have married, and their four great girls. but second, thank him for his excellent, as usual, on-target remarks. we have a great chairman of the j.e.c. and every time he comes to the floor, it shows shoas. olympia snowe, bill kristol, congressman mike simpson of idaho, david brooks, congresswoman bono-mack and walter jones, "the national review." we're here to ai seau passing the senate's middle-class tax cut is the right thing to do. you don't have to take our word for it. two-thirds of the american public agrees with us but you don't need to take their word for it, either. just listen to the voices within speaker boehner's own party. there we go. a kent conrad i am not in terms of my facility with charts. it's clear
. >> reporter: poppy harlow, cnn, new york. >> what a story. >>> people all over the nation are being asked to observe a moment of silence for the shooting victims tomorrow morning, once again, including on the internet. a silicon valley investor is asking websites across the country to go dark tomorrow morning at 9:30 a.m. eastern. that's exactly one week after that massacre at the elementary school. >>> other news we're following, including a powerful winter storm. it's blasting the midwest where the season's first blizzard is bringing life to a standstill and may be stranding thousands of early holiday travelers. >>> blinding snow, power outages and conditions getting worse. winter has arrived in the midwest. the blizzard is blamed for a 30-car pileup near ft. dodge, iowa. two people are dead. the storm is he cexpected to du another foot of snow in some areas before it is done. it looks like it's wet there. it's going to start snowing at tomorrow point, ted, and there will be a lot of flight cancellations at o'hare that could cause disruptions at other places as well? >> reporter: yes, w
and pennsylvania fellows and new york fellows were all good to me. >> like your colleague, daniel akaka and former transportation chairman norman, world war ii was important in the event in their lives and in your life as well. you serve in the most highly decorated unit in the history of the united states army and received a bronze star, distinguished service cross and middle of honor. can you tell us what you learned from that experience, and how did that experience impact your public career? >> well, there are certain things that haunt me even to this day. and that is the realization of that the war can change a person's character and personality. one might be content and say i'm a good person. now, for example one week before i got into the service and put on my uniform i was and sunday school teacher and i sang in acquire. my mother was a devout methodist , christian temperance movement. they don't get any more difficult than that. the whole family was that way. then after training and going overseas, i recalled telling the first german -- killing the first german. the thing that haunts me is
, puerto ricans in new york and chicago who are very liberal, but we're starting to see the rise of foreign-born latinos and their children who tend to be more conservative. i mean, just look at the pew numbers. on abortion still the majority believe that abortion should be legal compared to about 40% of the rest of the population. marriage, that is shifting. it has certainly shifted in the past five years, but there's still a good chunk of that electorate that is very conservative when it comes to, to marriage. the question is with social issues is not are you going to scare voters away. we believe that those who vote exclusively for those issues are going to vote, are mostly religious people who are going to vote for the candidate who has the traditional positions. nobody's not going to vote against the candidate because of their position of marriage within the latino community. >> right. it's scary to me because it is a place where we're not looking, again, we're not looking to the future. as a republican, we're counting on the older ones and not looking to how the vote is going to chang
americans, haitians, a big lgbt community, big arts community, a lot of internal migrants from new york, where the same way clark county has been -- you've got a pot, a core of white democratic activists that have brought california politics in nevada. ofmiami, you've got a core new york, northeastern democratic activists who brought those politics to south florida. and within that you're now starting to see very effective latino players, a democratic congressman who won a race against a highly flawed republican candidate, but still won, who formed a coalition that, you know, went from miami beach through working class neighborhoods, all the way down to the keys with very distinct different working class whites, gays, you know, snowbirders, and then a big chunk of cuban and non-cuban latinos. so, in the second part of it, you start thinking about identity politics in a different way. if you are thinking of a group that has flexed its muscles by virtue of being part of a coalition, as opposed to having flexed its muscles as being a plaintiff, as having been alone, as being outsiders sayi
this columnist for "the new york times" is brilliant in writing. he's a great, great journalist and explains things so well. i really have great admiration for him. he wrote yesterday, "republicans have to realize they are going to have to cave in on tax rates." that's the way it is, mr. president. "they're going to have to cave on tax rates." then on tuesday, day before yesterday, the senior senator from maine, olympia snowe, urged house republican leaders to end the suspense for middle-class taxpayers. "they shouldn't have to wonder whether we will ultimately raise taxes on low- to middle-income people." i assure them we won't raise taxes on the middle class on the poor, is what ow olympia snowe said. yesterday it seemed every practical republican left in washington was suddenly willing to say out loud what we have known for weeks: the only remaining option is for the house to pass the senate bill. dozens of house republicans signed onto a letter urging speaker boehner to take the last hexit before the cliff. neither president obama nor democrats in congress have ever been ambiguous about
pausener. jack is a loving sports enthusiast especially the new york giants. noah is a lively kid. president obama spoke at a service in newtown on sunday offering his condolences and emphasizing that enough is enough. >> obama: since i've been president, this is the fourth time we have come together to comfort a grieving community torn apart by mass shootings. these tragedies must end. >> the president said in the coming weeks he will engage law enforcement, mental health professionals to figure out what can be done. >> senator dianne feinstein is promises to introduce new legislation on the first day of the next congress. >> a bill to ban assault weapons. it will ban the sale, the transfer the importation and the possession. >> we'll have more throughout the morning. kind of guys that do reverse mortgage commercials? those type. those types are coming on to me all the time now. >>> she get's the comedians laughing... >>>that hilarious. >>>and the thinkers thinking. joy>>>okay so. there's wiggle room in the ten commandments i
reinforced the united states commitment to prevent the spread of aids and help end the pandemic. in new york. >> hundreds had to be evacuated after a train derailed on a new jersey bridge. the accident caused more than 12,000-gallons of chemicals to spill into a creek. 71 were treated for breathing problems and eye irritation. officials say the air is being monitored no longer poses a health risk. >> i have been told by the officials that are on scene with the railroad that there is still some product in that car that was breached that still needs to be removed. >> officials also say booms have been put in the creek to contain the chemicals. >> a controversial law that bans convicted sex offenders beaches and parks is being challenged by a panel of judges. they are asking the state court of appeals to review the measure after it overturned the conviction of a sex offender caught attending a party at a county park. the judged note that restrictions are up for the state legislature. >> the president facing mounting pressure to make a decision on whether to approve the keystone pipeline. s
are not allowed and individuals reside in states with high income tax. >> host: talking about new york, california -- >> guest: new york, california, d.c. however, is your previous guest of knowledge, if you do not enact the patch, a family of four, married couple with two children would begin to face the amt income levels as low as $70,000. it's been described as a blue state problem because of its impact on the estate tax deduction. it becomes every state problem becomes an additional tax. >> host: while we are talking here, if you wonder whether or not you follow in the amt and whether it impacts you, if you go to tax policy center.org, they have a calculator that would hope you plug in the numbers and figure out whether he would apply to you to do anything. we hear from joe first. republican caller, go ahead. >> host: yeah, on the alternative minimum tax, we didn't hear this discussed at all in this last election cycle and to me, we just heard about the very rich to get their income through stock, you know, paying only 15%. it seems to me it will affect them and they will affect the higher rat
arrived back home in western new york a disabled veteran. although my friends and family welcome me home, society did not receive me quite as well. while there were certainly tension on the politics of the vietnam war, it was the inaccessibility of my environment that made me feel the least welcome. i returned to a country not ready to receive me as a man who now used a wheelchair. that was the reality of an honors soldier would overcome -- the reality had to overcome until the united states improved laws to protect disabled. it is still a reality in many places overseas, places for a better at disabled citizens will likely travel in the future either for business or pleasure. we must ratify this treaty because protect the disabled and the united states of america and the right thing to do throughout the world. let me just again think senator kerry and senator lugar for their hard work on this treaty and we look forward to our colleagues voting for it in just a short hour from now. yield the floor. >> mr. president, how much time the reigns? >> 27 minutes remaining. >> and how much time
of maryland. maryland was hit hard, not as hard as new jersey or new york, and our prayers go out to all the communities that have been affected. but maryland was hit pretty hard. we had sustained winds for hour after hour after hour after hour. we had rainfall records -- nine inches. we had storm surges of seven-feet waves. we had flooding on the eastern shore of maryland. we had a storm in the western part of our state that dumped -- dropped 30 inches of wet snow. so we suffered from the -- the flooding on the eastern shore and the storms in western maryland. many of the communities were people who live below poverty are elderly. senator mikulski was just on the floor and talked about the circumstances in the city of crisfield n. that city. in that city, 32% of the population live blo live below e poverty level. 71% sustained water damage. waterman, which is one of the major industries for that community, found that they were literally unable to work and they're still unclear as to what's going to happen to their crops. so we have a serious problem. give you just two examples of people
jersey or new york, they get to decide. not the appropriators, not the authorizing committee, the cor corps's going to decide. well, i can tell you one organization that has a problem with priorities in this country today is the corps of engineers. and to blanket whatever they say as a priority versus having government oversight and committee oversight and appropriator oversight, by giving this blanket waiver, what we do is we take away our powers to correct them. and all this does is say that it's not automatically authorized and we will have plenty of time. because all these are mitigation projects. they all ought to be authorized and approved by the committee of jurisdiction as they go forward. all they have to do is come to congress and say, give us approval on this. rather than a blanket approval. and i think we're setting a terrible precedent, because what it says is, in the future, then we're going to let the corps decides what is important rather than the -- corps decide what is important rather than the governors, rather than the state legislature or rather than the congress.
was shot and injured in a fire fight. after months of rehas been takers i arrived back home in western new york a disabled veteran. although my friends and family welcomed me home, society did not receive me quite as we will. while there is certainly tension around the politics of the vietnam war, it was the inaccessibility of my environment that made me feel the least welcome. i returned to a country not ready to receive me as a man who now used a wheelchair." that was the reality of an honored soldier who had overcome -- it was the reality that an honored soldier had to overcome until the united states improved its laws to protect the disabled, and it is still a reality in many places overseas, places where our veterans and other disabled citizens will likely travel in the future. either for business or pleasure. we must ratify this treaty because protecting the rights of the disabled is the right thing to do in the united states of america, and it's the right thing to do throughout the world. and let me just again thank senator kerry and senator lugar for their hard work on this treaty,
/11, 2001 tragedy that hit new york and the pentagon, killing 3,000 americans. that 9/11 wreaked havoc on our economy, and that wasn't predictable. so add all these things up. all told, these and other economic and technical changes accounted for about $3.2 trillion. or as i show in this chart, these faulty assumptions accounted for 27% of the change of the 2001 projections from complus to deficit. by far, the biggest reason for the change from surplus to deficit was an increase in spending. some of this spending was justified. this includes bipartisan support for increased spending to protect our nation against future terrorist attacks, but of course it has become the custom around here. we have spent and spent and spent some more. this spending not only continued but escalated with the election of president obama. his first act was to increase the deficit by $800 billion-plus through a failed stimulus package, and all this increase in spending accounts for nearly 50% of the change from surplus to deficit. that's this part of the pie chart. so how about the tax cuts we hear so much ab
as an example. so let's just understand in this body so that there's no mistake that new york and surrounding areas will get their money because the principle of fema money and probably other disaster money as well is simply this -- at the beginning of a year, you have some money in fema, but you never know what the disasters are going to be throughout the next 12 months. but when a disaster is declared, there is money there to flow, and when that disaster money runs out, as far as i know, it's always been replaced. whether you have an earthquake in california or you have a hurricane in the gulf of mexico or you have drought in the midwest like we have or texas like we have or you have tornadoes like we have in the midwest, and sandy as the most recent example. as far as i know, there has never been any dispute under the laws at that time, and those laws don't change very often. they -- they do get the money out to the people that need it, and then when that fund goes dry, it is replenished by congress. now, unless somebody is seeking money other -- in some way other than other disasters that
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19

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